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Newsletter
Volume 109
December 3, 2012
Seasons Greetings!
As we enter into the holiday season, all of us at the Asmark Institute would like to wish you and your families a very Merry Christmas and a safe and prosperous New Year. We appreciate the relationship that has been developed between our organizations over the years, and especially the opportunity to have worked with you in 2012!
All New DVD Number 1 Ships
Watch for UPS to deliver your new DVD Number 1 in the next few days. Please be prepared to open your DVD as soon as you receive it and follow the instructions to complete the exchange. Remember to return your outdated DVD in the provided UPS Return Service packaging so it can be tracked.
"Waiting for the other shoe to drop"Waiting for Shoe to Drop
The old saying means waiting for something bad to happen in which you are expecting. It comes from a famous music hall joke about a man who is woken by the drunk upstairs dropping his shoe. He can't get back to sleep because he is waiting for the second crash on the ceiling. Not counting the turmoil in the economy, I believe most people in the agricultural industry would agree the first shoe dropped shortly after the 2008 presidential election and crash of the economy.
In the past four years we have watched as long-standing industry interpretations have been reversed, increasing numbers of federal agency employees have felt empowered to inspect and enforce as they see fit, and all while states seek to offset their growing budget deficits by levying more and more fines and penalties. Welcome to the "new normal" as it appears this trend won't change any time soon.
Politics is an activity that we've purposely chosen to avoid due to the nature of our work. With that said, we know through experience the second term of any administration, Republican or Democrat, sets the stage as the final chance to complete their agenda - usually at any cost, because the outgoing President has nothing to lose. On Friday, November 9th, the Obama administration posted 165 new regulations and notifications on its regulations.gov website indicating history really does repeat itself.
What can be done while we wait for the other shoe to drop? We recommend an all-out effort to dot your i's and cross your t's, but it will be more important than ever the regulated community understand the meaning and purpose of the regulations - before the inspector comes knocking. Given the increased number of inspections and audits anticipated in the future, it will be imperative the personnel at the facility know what their regulatory requirements are and be able to interact effectively with the regulator, providing them with the necessary documentation required by the regulations.
To help prepare, we are currently reviewing each of our client's performance on key regulatory requirements. Our review will include notification and/or follow-up with the client on any issue that needs attention and will most likely include enhancing the current alert reminder system. We're in this situation together with our clients....especially until the other shoe drops.
2013 Emergency Response to Agricultural Incidents Training
Watch your mail for the invitation to attend the first round of seven classes of the Emergency Response to Agricultural Incidents course at our training facility in LaVergne, Tennessee. This course is designed specifically for the personnel working at an agrichemical facility. It will provide the information and skills needed to recognize, evaluate and control an incident involving the release or potential release of the substances routinely found at an agrichemical facility. Every facility is required to have at least one or more people trained to the Technician and Incident Command Levels. Classes fill up fast so register today to ensure space is available for the class of your choice. Register online by clicking here.
myPPE Hazard Assessment Launches This Week
Asmark Institute clients have access to a new online Workplace Hazard Assessment that will assist them in completing and documenting this OSHA requirement. myPPE Hazard Assessment tool is designed to help define, organize and document the personal protective equipment required by a workplace, individual person or category of employees. Developed specifically for agricultural facilities, this unique tool leads the user through the process of identifying hazards, selecting the appropriate PPE and documenting the exercise. Data is retained for periodic review and update. OSHA developed regulations regarding personal protective equipment (PPE) to ensure employees are adequately protected while on the job. Employers must periodically assess the hazards that are present and that could pose harm to their employees. For each task, the employer needs to choose personal protective gear that will properly protect the employee from the hazards identified in the hazard assessment.
FMCSA Says Time is Up for Unsatisfactory Carriers
The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is no longer allowing a 10-day extension of the deadline for when passenger and hazardous materials motor carriers must stop operating after receiving a proposed unsatisfactory safety rating. The agency previously discontinued the practice of granting extensions as a matter of policy and has now amended the regulation to be consistent with that policy. Although the FMCSA will continue to review requests for upgrades of proposed unsatisfactory safety ratings for such carriers, the agency will no longer grant extensions to the standard 45-day review period. Due to the rule change, the agency recommends that passenger and hazmat carriers who receive a proposed unsatisfactory safety fitness rating should submit their evidence of corrective actions within 15 days in order to ensure enough time for review.
As background, under 49 CFR 385.17, a motor carrier transporting passengers or hazardous materials in quantities requiring placarding may request an upgrade of a conditional or unsatisfactory safety rating based on corrective actions it has taken. If the FMCSA proposes an unsatisfactory safety rating, the carrier faces a 45-day deadline to either take corrective actions or stop operating commercial vehicles. If the corrective actions are insufficient, the carrier has to stop transporting passengers or hazardous materials on the 46th day. Under previous rules, if the carrier submitted evidence that corrective action was taken and the FMCSA was unable to make its determination within the 45-day review period, the agency could extend the review period by up to 10 additional days. That type of extension is no longer allowed. The regulation change became effective November 23, 2012.
Brake Safety: One in seven vehicles inspected placed out-of-service
Commercial vehicle inspectors participating in the recent Brake Safety Week, the annual enforcement and education campaign focused on regulatory compliance of truck and bus brake system maintenance, found at least one in seven vehicles chosen for inspection had brake-related out-of-service (OOS) violations, according to the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA). These rates are comparable to recent years, but slightly higher for the second year in a row. Of the 21,255 vehicles inspected September 9-15, the OOS rate for all brake-related violations was 15.3 percent. This is higher than in 2011, 2010 and 2009 (at 14.2 percent, 13.5 percent, and 15.1 percent, respectively), but lower than in 2008 and 2007 (18.4 percent and 17.8 percent respectively).
The OOS rates for inspections in Canada were lower than in the United States, which is consistent with previous findings, and resulted in 10.8 percent of vehicles being placed OOS for brakes, compared to 15.5 percent in the U.S. This year, 9.6 percent of vehicles inspected in the U.S. during Brake Safety Week were placed OOS for poor brake adjustment, compared to 5.5 percent in Canada.
"Commercial vehicles with OOS violations are considered imminent hazards to highway safety. Stopping distances of trucks and buses are longer than passenger cars and they increase significantly with many of the brake violations found during these inspections," said CVSA Executive Director Stephen A. Keppler. Over 2.6 million brakes have been inspected in the 15 years since the program's inception.
Are You Monitoring Your CSA Score?
DOT's Comprehensive Safety Analysis (CSA) Safety Measurement System (SMS) website is available and motor carriers are highly recommended to check their safety scores: http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms. To login into the SMS website and see your safety data, you will need an FMCSA-issued U.S. DOT Number Personal Identification Number (PIN). If you do not know or have forgotten your PIN, you can request one via http://safer.fmcsa.dot.gov/ and select "Click here to request your Docket Number PIN and/or USDOT Number PIN." Be sure to request a U.S. DOT Number PIN, NOT a Docket Number PIN.
IRS Examines Dual-use Equipment
On November 19th, IRS announced its intention to review "dual-use property" as part of its 2013 Priority Guidance Plan. IRS will be requesting public comment on whether equipment held simultaneously for sale and for lease should be eligible for depreciation deductions and/or like-kind exchange treatment. IRS agents have raised questions about these issues from time to time, causing headaches for equipment dealers and other ag-related business owners, so the forthcoming process may present an opportunity for the industry to resolve the questions once and for all.
Free OSHA On-site Assistance Offered
OSHA's On-site Consultation Program offers free and confidential health and safety advice to small and medium-sized businesses in all states across the country, with priority given to high-hazard worksites. Each year, responding to requests from small employers looking to improve workplace health and safety and their safety and health management programs, OSHA's On-site Consultation Program conducts over 29,000 visits to small business worksites covering over 1.5 million workers across the nation. On-site consultation services are separate from enforcement and do not result in penalties or citations. Consultants from state agencies or universities work with employers to identify workplace hazards, provide advice on compliance with OSHA standards and assist in establishing safety and health management programs. For more information, to find the local On-site Consultation office in your state or to request a brochure on Consultation Services, call 1-800-321-6742.
IRS Announces 2013 Standard Mileage Rates
Beginning on January 1, 2013, the standard optional mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be: 56.5 cents per mile for business miles driven; 24 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes; and 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations. The rate increases 1 cent from the 2012 rates. Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates.
FMCSA Retracts Change to GCWR Definition
FMCSA has withdrawn a rule that would have amended the definition of "gross combination weight rating" (GCWR) under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations. Though the rule was published in late August and was due to take effect on October 26, 2012, the FMCSA was forced to withdraw it because the agency received public comments opposing the change. The GCWR definition, found in 49 CFR Sections 383.5 and 390.5, relies on the vehicle's manufacturer to supply the GCWR. However, the definition goes on to state that if the GCWR is missing from the vehicle's certification label, the GCWR can be calculated by adding together the gross vehicle weight rating of the power unit and the total weight of the towed unit. The FMCSA says this wording "is essentially guidance that is difficult for the motor carrier and enforcement communities to use." The agency decided that it should rely solely on the manufacturer to supply the rating and remove the option to calculate the GCWR. Instead of taking public comments on the issue in advance, however, the agency issued a "direct final rule" to make the change. Because the FMCSA received adverse comments after the rule was announced, it was withdrawn. Two of the commenters argued that, before the definition can be changed, manufacturers should be required to include the GCWR on all their vehicles. The GCWR definition is important because it can be used to determine what a "commercial motor vehicle" is, and thus which federal regulations might apply. FMCSA says it will consider the comments it received and issue the rule as a new proposal, and then will accept additional public comments. Comments may be viewed online at regulations.gov under Docket No. FMCSA-2012-0156. The notice of withdrawal became effective October 26, 2012.
General Industry Digest
OSHA Updates the General Industry Digest
OSHA's updated General Industry Digest, the booklet that summarizes General Industry safety and health standards to help employers, supervisors, workers, health and safety committee members and safety and health personnel learn about OSHA standards in the workplace - is now available. The digest includes updated information on revisions to General Industry standards since the digest was last published in 2001. Click here for a copy of the General Industry Digest.
Work-related Injuries From All-Terrain Vehicle Use Increasing
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recently published a report of hazards related to All-Terrain Vehicle use that shows that work-related injuries are on the rise. NIOSH estimates that 11 million of these vehicles were in use in 2010 (for both recreational and work-related purposes). Forty-one workers were killed using ATVs in the final year of the NIOSH study. OSHA has published a Safety and Health Information Bulletin on hazards of ATV use in the workplace that provides information on the operating conditions and specific activities that most often lead to ATV-related injuries and fatalities; the guidelines and training an employer can use to help protect employees; and the work practices that workers can follow to reduce the potential for ATV-related accidents. Click here for the bulletin or for additional information on ATV safety; click here for the NIOSH publication All-Terrain Vehicle Safety at Work.
$25 Billion in Crop Insurance to be Paid Out for 2012
According to recent estimates, crop insurance may pay out a record $25 billion in claims this year. That would be more than double the record high of $10.8 billion in 2011. More than 80% of U.S. corn acres planted in 2012 were covered by crop insurance.
Concrete That Heals Itself to Undergo Testing
A new type of concrete is about to undergo outdoor testing. The material, which contains bacteria that produces limestone, is said to heal its own micro-cracks, according to researchers at Delft Technical University in the Netherlands.
State Labor Law Poster Updates
Kentucky - Unemployment Insurance - Effective January 2013
Kentucky has removed text from their Unemployment Insurance notice referring to medical restrictions. Formerly, the notice mentioned work-related medical restrictions that lead to less than normal work hours being potentially allowable for partial benefits. The notice now only refers to less than normal hours due to lack of work. Other changes include new phone numbers and a reformatted header. This includes a material substantive change and a new Kentucky Labor Law Poster is required. Click here to order.
Lincoln Quote
Texas - Workers' Compensation Notices 5 & 6 - Effective January 2013 Texas revised the Workers' Compensation Notice 6 to include text referring injured employees to the Office of Injured Employee Counsel for free assistance and information about rights and responsibilities under the Workers' Compensation Act. Additionally, both Notice 5 & 6 had a number of formatting and layout changes. The new notices (which one is posted depending on whether the employer has Workers' Compensation Insurance or not), per the state, must be replaced on January 1, 2013. This includes a material substantive change and a new Texas Labor Law Poster is required. Click here to order.
Most Quotable: "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." -- Abraham Lincoln, 16th U.S. President
2012 Asmark Institute, Inc. This information is believed to be reliable by the Asmark Institute, however, because of constantly changing government regulations, interpretations and applicability or the possibility of human, mechanical or computer error, the Asmark Institute does not guarantee the information as suitable for any particular purpose.
Seasons Greetings!
As we enter into the holiday season, all of us at the Asmark Institute would like to wish you and your families a very Merry Christmas and a safe and prosperous New Year. We appreciate the relationship that has been developed between our organizations over the years, and especially the opportunity to have worked with you in 2012!
All New DVD Number 1 Ships
Watch for UPS to deliver your new DVD Number 1 in the next few days. Please be prepared to open your DVD as soon as you receive it and follow the instructions to complete the exchange. Remember to return your outdated DVD in the provided UPS Return Service packaging so it can be tracked.
"Waiting for the other shoe to drop"Waiting for Shoe to Drop
The old saying means waiting for something bad to happen in which you are expecting. It comes from a famous music hall joke about a man who is woken by the drunk upstairs dropping his shoe. He can't get back to sleep because he is waiting for the second crash on the ceiling. Not counting the turmoil in the economy, I believe most people in the agricultural industry would agree the first shoe dropped shortly after the 2008 presidential election and crash of the economy.
In the past four years we have watched as long-standing industry interpretations have been reversed, increasing numbers of federal agency employees have felt empowered to inspect and enforce as they see fit, and all while states seek to offset their growing budget deficits by levying more and more fines and penalties. Welcome to the "new normal" as it appears this trend won't change any time soon.
Politics is an activity that we've purposely chosen to avoid due to the nature of our work. With that said, we know through experience the second term of any administration, Republican or Democrat, sets the stage as the final chance to complete their agenda - usually at any cost, because the outgoing President has nothing to lose. On Friday, November 9th, the Obama administration posted 165 new regulations and notifications on its regulations.gov website indicating history really does repeat itself.
What can be done while we wait for the other shoe to drop? We recommend an all-out effort to dot your i's and cross your t's, but it will be more important than ever the regulated community understand the meaning and purpose of the regulations - before the inspector comes knocking. Given the increased number of inspections and audits anticipated in the future, it will be imperative the personnel at the facility know what their regulatory requirements are and be able to interact effectively with the regulator, providing them with the necessary documentation required by the regulations.
To help prepare, we are currently reviewing each of our client's performance on key regulatory requirements. Our review will include notification and/or follow-up with the client on any issue that needs attention and will most likely include enhancing the current alert reminder system. We're in this situation together with our clients....especially until the other shoe drops.
2013 Emergency Response to Agricultural Incidents Training
Watch your mail for the invitation to attend the first round of seven classes of the Emergency Response to Agricultural Incidents course at our training facility in LaVergne, Tennessee. This course is designed specifically for the personnel working at an agrichemical facility. It will provide the information and skills needed to recognize, evaluate and control an incident involving the release or potential release of the substances routinely found at an agrichemical facility. Every facility is required to have at least one or more people trained to the Technician and Incident Command Levels. Classes fill up fast so register today to ensure space is available for the class of your choice. Register online by clicking here.
myPPE Hazard Assessment Launches This Week
Asmark Institute clients have access to a new online Workplace Hazard Assessment that will assist them in completing and documenting this OSHA requirement. myPPE Hazard Assessment tool is designed to help define, organize and document the personal protective equipment required by a workplace, individual person or category of employees. Developed specifically for agricultural facilities, this unique tool leads the user through the process of identifying hazards, selecting the appropriate PPE and documenting the exercise. Data is retained for periodic review and update. OSHA developed regulations regarding personal protective equipment (PPE) to ensure employees are adequately protected while on the job. Employers must periodically assess the hazards that are present and that could pose harm to their employees. For each task, the employer needs to choose personal protective gear that will properly protect the employee from the hazards identified in the hazard assessment.
FMCSA Says Time is Up for Unsatisfactory Carriers
The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is no longer allowing a 10-day extension of the deadline for when passenger and hazardous materials motor carriers must stop operating after receiving a proposed unsatisfactory safety rating. The agency previously discontinued the practice of granting extensions as a matter of policy and has now amended the regulation to be consistent with that policy. Although the FMCSA will continue to review requests for upgrades of proposed unsatisfactory safety ratings for such carriers, the agency will no longer grant extensions to the standard 45-day review period. Due to the rule change, the agency recommends that passenger and hazmat carriers who receive a proposed unsatisfactory safety fitness rating should submit their evidence of corrective actions within 15 days in order to ensure enough time for review.
As background, under 49 CFR 385.17, a motor carrier transporting passengers or hazardous materials in quantities requiring placarding may request an upgrade of a conditional or unsatisfactory safety rating based on corrective actions it has taken. If the FMCSA proposes an unsatisfactory safety rating, the carrier faces a 45-day deadline to either take corrective actions or stop operating commercial vehicles. If the corrective actions are insufficient, the carrier has to stop transporting passengers or hazardous materials on the 46th day. Under previous rules, if the carrier submitted evidence that corrective action was taken and the FMCSA was unable to make its determination within the 45-day review period, the agency could extend the review period by up to 10 additional days. That type of extension is no longer allowed. The regulation change became effective November 23, 2012.
Brake Safety: One in seven vehicles inspected placed out-of-service
Commercial vehicle inspectors participating in the recent Brake Safety Week, the annual enforcement and education campaign focused on regulatory compliance of truck and bus brake system maintenance, found at least one in seven vehicles chosen for inspection had brake-related out-of-service (OOS) violations, according to the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA). These rates are comparable to recent years, but slightly higher for the second year in a row. Of the 21,255 vehicles inspected September 9-15, the OOS rate for all brake-related violations was 15.3 percent. This is higher than in 2011, 2010 and 2009 (at 14.2 percent, 13.5 percent, and 15.1 percent, respectively), but lower than in 2008 and 2007 (18.4 percent and 17.8 percent respectively).
The OOS rates for inspections in Canada were lower than in the United States, which is consistent with previous findings, and resulted in 10.8 percent of vehicles being placed OOS for brakes, compared to 15.5 percent in the U.S. This year, 9.6 percent of vehicles inspected in the U.S. during Brake Safety Week were placed OOS for poor brake adjustment, compared to 5.5 percent in Canada.
"Commercial vehicles with OOS violations are considered imminent hazards to highway safety. Stopping distances of trucks and buses are longer than passenger cars and they increase significantly with many of the brake violations found during these inspections," said CVSA Executive Director Stephen A. Keppler. Over 2.6 million brakes have been inspected in the 15 years since the program's inception.
Are You Monitoring Your CSA Score?
DOT's Comprehensive Safety Analysis (CSA) Safety Measurement System (SMS) website is available and motor carriers are highly recommended to check their safety scores: http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms. To login into the SMS website and see your safety data, you will need an FMCSA-issued U.S. DOT Number Personal Identification Number (PIN). If you do not know or have forgotten your PIN, you can request one via http://safer.fmcsa.dot.gov/ and select "Click here to request your Docket Number PIN and/or USDOT Number PIN." Be sure to request a U.S. DOT Number PIN, NOT a Docket Number PIN.
IRS Examines Dual-use Equipment
On November 19th, IRS announced its intention to review "dual-use property" as part of its 2013 Priority Guidance Plan. IRS will be requesting public comment on whether equipment held simultaneously for sale and for lease should be eligible for depreciation deductions and/or like-kind exchange treatment. IRS agents have raised questions about these issues from time to time, causing headaches for equipment dealers and other ag-related business owners, so the forthcoming process may present an opportunity for the industry to resolve the questions once and for all.
Free OSHA On-site Assistance Offered
OSHA's On-site Consultation Program offers free and confidential health and safety advice to small and medium-sized businesses in all states across the country, with priority given to high-hazard worksites. Each year, responding to requests from small employers looking to improve workplace health and safety and their safety and health management programs, OSHA's On-site Consultation Program conducts over 29,000 visits to small business worksites covering over 1.5 million workers across the nation. On-site consultation services are separate from enforcement and do not result in penalties or citations. Consultants from state agencies or universities work with employers to identify workplace hazards, provide advice on compliance with OSHA standards and assist in establishing safety and health management programs. For more information, to find the local On-site Consultation office in your state or to request a brochure on Consultation Services, call 1-800-321-6742.
IRS Announces 2013 Standard Mileage Rates
Beginning on January 1, 2013, the standard optional mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be: 56.5 cents per mile for business miles driven; 24 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes; and 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations. The rate increases 1 cent from the 2012 rates. Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates.
FMCSA Retracts Change to GCWR Definition
FMCSA has withdrawn a rule that would have amended the definition of "gross combination weight rating" (GCWR) under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations. Though the rule was published in late August and was due to take effect on October 26, 2012, the FMCSA was forced to withdraw it because the agency received public comments opposing the change. The GCWR definition, found in 49 CFR Sections 383.5 and 390.5, relies on the vehicle's manufacturer to supply the GCWR. However, the definition goes on to state that if the GCWR is missing from the vehicle's certification label, the GCWR can be calculated by adding together the gross vehicle weight rating of the power unit and the total weight of the towed unit. The FMCSA says this wording "is essentially guidance that is difficult for the motor carrier and enforcement communities to use." The agency decided that it should rely solely on the manufacturer to supply the rating and remove the option to calculate the GCWR. Instead of taking public comments on the issue in advance, however, the agency issued a "direct final rule" to make the change. Because the FMCSA received adverse comments after the rule was announced, it was withdrawn. Two of the commenters argued that, before the definition can be changed, manufacturers should be required to include the GCWR on all their vehicles. The GCWR definition is important because it can be used to determine what a "commercial motor vehicle" is, and thus which federal regulations might apply. FMCSA says it will consider the comments it received and issue the rule as a new proposal, and then will accept additional public comments. Comments may be viewed online at regulations.gov under Docket No. FMCSA-2012-0156. The notice of withdrawal became effective October 26, 2012.
General Industry Digest
OSHA Updates the General Industry Digest
OSHA's updated General Industry Digest, the booklet that summarizes General Industry safety and health standards to help employers, supervisors, workers, health and safety committee members and safety and health personnel learn about OSHA standards in the workplace - is now available. The digest includes updated information on revisions to General Industry standards since the digest was last published in 2001. Click here for a copy of the General Industry Digest.
Work-related Injuries From All-Terrain Vehicle Use Increasing
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recently published a report of hazards related to All-Terrain Vehicle use that shows that work-related injuries are on the rise. NIOSH estimates that 11 million of these vehicles were in use in 2010 (for both recreational and work-related purposes). Forty-one workers were killed using ATVs in the final year of the NIOSH study. OSHA has published a Safety and Health Information Bulletin on hazards of ATV use in the workplace that provides information on the operating conditions and specific activities that most often lead to ATV-related injuries and fatalities; the guidelines and training an employer can use to help protect employees; and the work practices that workers can follow to reduce the potential for ATV-related accidents. Click here for the bulletin or for additional information on ATV safety; click here for the NIOSH publication All-Terrain Vehicle Safety at Work.
$25 Billion in Crop Insurance to be Paid Out for 2012
According to recent estimates, crop insurance may pay out a record $25 billion in claims this year. That would be more than double the record high of $10.8 billion in 2011. More than 80% of U.S. corn acres planted in 2012 were covered by crop insurance.
Concrete That Heals Itself to Undergo Testing
A new type of concrete is about to undergo outdoor testing. The material, which contains bacteria that produces limestone, is said to heal its own micro-cracks, according to researchers at Delft Technical University in the Netherlands.
State Labor Law Poster Updates
Kentucky - Unemployment Insurance - Effective January 2013
Kentucky has removed text from their Unemployment Insurance notice referring to medical restrictions. Formerly, the notice mentioned work-related medical restrictions that lead to less than normal work hours being potentially allowable for partial benefits. The notice now only refers to less than normal hours due to lack of work. Other changes include new phone numbers and a reformatted header. This includes a material substantive change and a new Kentucky Labor Law Poster is required. Click here to order.
Lincoln Quote
Texas - Workers' Compensation Notices 5 & 6 - Effective January 2013 Texas revised the Workers' Compensation Notice 6 to include text referring injured employees to the Office of Injured Employee Counsel for free assistance and information about rights and responsibilities under the Workers' Compensation Act. Additionally, both Notice 5 & 6 had a number of formatting and layout changes. The new notices (which one is posted depending on whether the employer has Workers' Compensation Insurance or not), per the state, must be replaced on January 1, 2013. This includes a material substantive change and a new Texas Labor Law Poster is required. Click here to order.
Most Quotable: "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." -- Abraham Lincoln, 16th U.S. President
2012 Asmark Institute, Inc. This information is believed to be reliable by the Asmark Institute, however, because of constantly changing government regulations, interpretations and applicability or the possibility of human, mechanical or computer error, the Asmark Institute does not guarantee the information as suitable for any particular purpose.